Skip to content

Blog

2

I was happy to contribute to this new article about the current state of LGBT senior housing by Dave Singleton on Caring.Com. It's a worthwhile read about an issue few people are attuned to.

"There is a great need for LGBT senior services and housing options, which have gained steam in the last decade, led by the rise of older LGBT baby boomers. But there’s still work to do. Is it getting better for LGBT seniors who need help and a place to live? How can we make sure none of them takes a backward step into a senior living closet?"

Read the full article on Caring.com.

[Also see 21 Retirement Communities for LGBT Seniors]

6

Your retirement presents you with the opportunity to truly live your life on your own terms. You are no longer bound by the constraints of your job. You are now free to do the things you have wanted to do for years, limited only by your available resources and your mobility. It would be unfortunate to reach the end of your retirement journey, only to have regrets for the things you could have done, but didn’t.

With a little thoughtfulness and planning, you can avoid these twelve regrets during your retirement.

...continue reading "12 Regrets You Can Avoid in Retirement"

2

It’s not uncommon for two-career couples to retire at different times. This may happen when there is a significant age difference or if one spouse retires sooner than planned due to an unexpected layoff or an irresistible early retirement incentive package. In other cases, one spouse may feel burnt out and ready to throw in the towel while the other spouse is at the peak of his or her career and wants to keep going for a few more years.

Whatever the circumstances, mixed-retirement marriages are situations ripe for resentment and stress. For a time, you and your spouse will have to coexist in different realities, something for which you may be ill-prepared. Here are seven tips that will help you and your spouse adjust to having one spouse work while the other is retired.

...continue reading "7 Tips for Thriving as a Mixed-Retirement Couple"

11

Throughout your working years, you have probably viewed your retirement as a destination. It is a goal you are saving for and will hopefully reach one day. But once you reach this destination, then what?

The perception of retirement as a destination may be why some people approach retirement with dread rather than anticipation. They view retirement as a finish line or as the end of the road.

But retirement is simply a milestone you pass on your journey. It’s like crossing the border from one state to the next. The road will continue to unfold before you.

...continue reading "Your Retirement is a Journey, Not a Destination"

10

Most lists of top retirement destinations focus on medium to large cities. For LGBT baby boomers, as well as many others who prefer places with diverse populations with thriving arts and culture scenes, larger cities usually have the most to offer. Larger cities also provide more options for medical care and senior support services.

But if you prefer the more relaxed pace of small town living but still hope to find an inclusive and welcoming community with a fun, artsy ambiance, you’re in luck. Here are five small, affordable, LGBT-friendly towns with big personalities that are worth your consideration as retirement destinations.

...continue reading "5 LGBT-Friendly Small Town Retirement Destinations"

6

Many retirement articles have been written about all the wonderful things you can do with the free time you will have after you retire. Once you leave work, you’ll have more time to travel, volunteer, take courses, play golf, enjoy hobbies and so much more. The possibilities seem endless. All of these articles talk about everything you can add to your life.

After adding many of these things to your life, you could easily find yourself busier than you were during your working years. But filling your life with busyness probably won’t make you happier. In fact, it could leave you more stressed out.

As it turns out, your happiness in retirement could be determined as much by what you remove from your life as what you add.

Here are four things you could eliminate from your life to be happier in retirement.

...continue reading "4 Things to Eliminate From Your Life for a Happy Retirement"

2

Many people move to a smaller house at some point after they retire. Downsizing might make sense for both financial and logistical reasons, but it might not be an advantageous choice in every situation. There are many factors you should consider in order to decide whether downsizing is right for you. Here are some of the pros and cons of moving to a smaller home.

...continue reading "How to Decide Whether Downsizing is the Right Choice for You"

2

Guest post by Ryan Beardsley

As our parents get older, we often find ourselves in the ultimate role reversal. Instead of relying on them for advice and moral support, we're the ones providing guidance.

This is especially true when your parents are moving to a retirement community. The process of helping your parents move can be extremely stressful. However, it doesn't have to be this way.

Phyllis Ashcraft, a senior transition specialist and owner of Solutions for Transition, says that moving is hard at any age, but even more so for an aging parent. "When you are young," she says, "a move is generally a touchstone of moving forward in your life, a looking forward to what's to come.

"When you are older," she adds, "a move can be more emotional, especially if it is away from friends. The emotional aspect can be much more difficult than the physical move itself."

...continue reading "How to Help Move Your Parents into a Retirement Community"

While you may view retirement as a long-anticipated emancipation from the work world, it is also a period of considerable change and adjustment. If you are married, some of the most profound changes will take place within the context of your relationship with your spouse.

For some couples, the fact that they have been drifting apart for years could be masked or ignored because most of their time and attention is devoted to their careers or raising a family. For these couples, suddenly spending more time together may present a reality they aren’t prepared for. They may find that they no longer have as much in common as they did while they were dating and during the early years of their marriage.

Even happy, well-adjusted couples will find that many aspects of their relationship will undergo change and require adjustment. Not surprisingly, honest discussion and a willingness to compromise and explore new solutions will help you deal with most challenges.

Here are ten suggestions that will help you and your spouse navigate the inevitable changes that will take place when you retire and enable you to better enjoy your remaining years together.

...continue reading "10 Tips to Help Your Marriage Survive Retirement"

Guest post by Louise Procter

Retirement can be a lifestyle game changer. Most people work hard their entire lives and dream of the day they can finally retire. And so they should; retirement is a well-deserved reward for a life’s hard work. Some people find themselves running towards the goal with fierce determination, while others may crawl and collapse across the finish line. Either way you’re here and well done!

Hopefully, you have spent some time thinking about how you will spend retirement. Even if it’s just a few glimpses and daydreams here and there, chances are you’ve got a bit of a plan.

But what happens when those plans clash with your significant other’s?

...continue reading "What to Do When Your Plans for Retirement Aren’t Anything Like Your Partner’s"