About Dave Hughes

My name is Dave Hughes. I live in Phoenix, AZ, and have recently retired. My goal is to help you envision, plan for, and ultimately enjoy the best retirement possible.

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Many retirement articles have been written about all the wonderful things you can do with the free time you will have after you retire. Once you leave work, you’ll have more time to travel, volunteer, take courses, play golf, enjoy hobbies and so much more. The possibilities seem endless. All of these articles talk about everything you can add to your life.

After adding many of these things to your life, you could easily find yourself busier than you were during your working years. But filling your life with busyness probably won’t make you happier. In fact, it could leave you more stressed out.

As it turns out, your happiness in retirement could be determined as much by what you remove from your life as what you add.

Here are four things you could eliminate from your life to be happier in retirement.

...continue reading "4 Things to Eliminate From Your Life for a Happy Retirement"

Many people move to a smaller house at some point after they retire. Downsizing might make sense for both financial and logistical reasons, but it might not be an advantageous choice in every situation. There are many factors you should consider in order to decide whether downsizing is right for you. Here are some of the pros and cons of moving to a smaller home.

...continue reading "How to Decide Whether Downsizing is the Right Choice for You"

Guest post by Ryan Beardsley

As our parents get older, we often find ourselves in the ultimate role reversal. Instead of relying on them for advice and moral support, we're the ones providing guidance.

This is especially true when your parents are moving to a retirement community. The process of helping your parents move can be extremely stressful. However, it doesn't have to be this way.

Phyllis Ashcraft, a senior transition specialist and owner of Solutions for Transition, says that moving is hard at any age, but even more so for an aging parent. "When you are young," she says, "a move is generally a touchstone of moving forward in your life, a looking forward to what's to come.

"When you are older," she adds, "a move can be more emotional, especially if it is away from friends. The emotional aspect can be much more difficult than the physical move itself."

...continue reading "How to Help Move Your Parents into a Retirement Community"

While you may view retirement as a long-anticipated emancipation from the work world, it is also a period of considerable change and adjustment. If you are married, some of the most profound changes will take place within the context of your relationship with your spouse.

For some couples, the fact that they have been drifting apart for years could be masked or ignored because most of their time and attention is devoted to their careers or raising a family. For these couples, suddenly spending more time together may present a reality they aren’t prepared for. They may find that they no longer have as much in common as they did while they were dating and during the early years of their marriage.

Even happy, well-adjusted couples will find that many aspects of their relationship will undergo change and require adjustment. Not surprisingly, honest discussion and a willingness to compromise and explore new solutions will help you deal with most challenges.

Here are ten suggestions that will help you and your spouse navigate the inevitable changes that will take place when you retire and enable you to better enjoy your remaining years together.

...continue reading "10 Tips to Help Your Marriage Survive Retirement"

Guest post by Louise Procter

Retirement can be a lifestyle game changer. Most people work hard their entire lives and dream of the day they can finally retire. And so they should; retirement is a well-deserved reward for a life’s hard work. Some people find themselves running towards the goal with fierce determination, while others may crawl and collapse across the finish line. Either way you’re here and well done!

Hopefully, you have spent some time thinking about how you will spend retirement. Even if it’s just a few glimpses and daydreams here and there, chances are you’ve got a bit of a plan.

But what happens when those plans clash with your significant other’s?

...continue reading "What to Do When Your Plans for Retirement Aren’t Anything Like Your Partner’s"

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After you retire, you may believe that you no longer need to manage your time. Perhaps you regard time management as something you get to leave behind when you end your working career. After all, you have been a slave to your work schedule for decades.

If you are not retired yet, you may envision that the ultimate retirement lifestyle will consist of getting up whenever you want, eating whenever you want, doing whatever you want or nothing at all, and going to bed whenever you want.

That may be therapeutic for the first few weeks after you leave your job. It can help you decompress from decades of work. But that approach won’t remain satisfying for very long.

With no discipline or direction, you’ll discover that days and weeks will pass without doing much that’s meaningful. The next thing you know, months will have passed and you’ll have no idea where the time went or what you did. You will end up bored, unhappy and sedentary. You’ll spend most of your time in front of the TV or the computer. That’s probably not what you had in mind for your retirement. It’s not very healthy, either.

...continue reading "Why You Still Need Time Management after You Retire"

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For over 60 years, millions of retirees have chosen to move to age-restricted active adult communities where they can live out their remaining years surrounded by golf courses, swimming pools, organized activities and – perhaps most important – other retirees.

Many people are drawn by the appeal of living in a safe, leisure-focused environment that is isolated from many of life’s realities, such as rush-hour traffic jams, undesirable neighborhoods and families with children.

Although many active adult communities are located in warmer states such as Florida, Arizona, and the Carolinas, they may be found throughout the United States and in some foreign countries.

While the lifestyle and amenities that age-restricted active adult communities offer are a good fit for many retirees, these places are not for everybody. If you are considering moving to a retirement community, here are ten questions you must consider before you put your house on the market and start packing.

...continue reading "10 Factors You Must Consider Before Moving to a Retirement Community"

Guest post by Maggie Drag

It’s rewarding to see people of every age embracing what makes them feel alive! What’s wonderful is that the older you get, the more you are able to cultivate and enjoy the things that make you feel alive. Here are four ways to make the most of the rest of your life.

...continue reading "The Perks of Growing Older"

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When it comes to selecting a highly desirable retirement destination, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) people have a few additional criteria to consider than do most Americans. In addition to considerations such as low cost of living and low taxes, LGBT people tend to value cities with strong LGBT communities, higher levels of acceptance and the presence of non-discrimination laws.

Cities that are most famous for their prominent LGBT communities, such as New York City, San Francisco and Los Angeles, are also very expensive. LGBT baby boomers who want to stretch their retirement dollars farther would do well to consider these cities that offer lower cost of living, cheaper real estate and lighter tax burden, but still have thriving LGBT communities. These cities are excellent retirement choices for non-LGBT people as well, because cities where LGBT people enjoy greater acceptance tend to be more welcoming of all types of diverse people and offer plentiful art and cultural amenities.

...continue reading "10 Best U.S. Cities for LGBT Retirees"

Guest post by Riya Sander

During the early years of working, you probably viewed retirement as a far-off dream. As retirement looms closer, however, the thought of leaving behind the familiarity of work can raise questions about your readiness. As you are planning for your retirement, you might be asking yourself the following questions. Luckily, we have answers.

...continue reading "6 Questions That Will Help You Get Ready for Retirement"