Guest post by Riya Sander

Many people look forward to retirement. They expect to catch up on all their projects, get completely organized and do some traveling. A few months or a year later, they may be looking around for new things to do because they're getting bored in retirement. Aside from the tediousness of boredom, being retired can also be a risk factor for depression.

Here are 7 ways you can prevent boredom in retirement.

...continue reading "7 Tips For Preventing Retirement Boredom"

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Beautiful sunsets are there to be enjoyed by everyone, regardless of income.

Hopefully, by the time you retire you will have saved a sufficient amount of money to be able to live comfortably and do the things you want to do. But if you are facing retirement with less money than you would prefer, don’t despair. It’s important to remember that there’s a lot more to enjoying a happy retirement and a happy life than simply saving enough money. True wealth and happiness come from many sources.

...continue reading "8 Things That Matter More Than Money for a Happy Retirement"

You can take action now to help ensure that you will have the support you need later.

The number of senior citizens who are single, isolated, and who lack a support system to help them deal with health issues and day-to-day living activities has been increasing, prompting the geriatric care industry to coin the term “Elder Orphan.”

Many factors contribute to the increase in Elder Orphans. People are living longer. Marriage rates in the U.S. have been declining for several decades. More couples are choosing to remain childless, and those that do have children are having fewer of them. As mobility has increased, more families have become dispersed as children moved away from home to pursue careers or as parents retired to warmer locales.

These changing demographic trends are aligning to create a perfect storm for an increase in senior isolation and a greater need for a network of caregivers that comes from outside the family.

Here are seven steps you can take to ensure that you will be better prepared and receive the assistance you need when your ability to live independently decreases. If you have older family members and friends, you can encourage them to take these steps and offer to assist them if appropriate.

...continue reading "7 Steps You Can Take to Avoid Becoming an Elder Orphan"

Guest post by Lynn Lotkowictz

About three years ago, at age 62, I was finishing up my media sales management career and realized it was time to move on. My pension was set so I was lucky that I had flexibility. I knew I no longer wanted a full-time job.

Retire? But to what? I don't play golf, crochet, play bridge or enjoy any of those interests my friends do. I adore my grandson and family, but they are 1,200 miles away so a weekend four or five times a year is the best I can do.

Travel, the outdoors, healthy endeavors and children are my passions. In 2013, I started to work on a plan for the next phase of life. The goal was for it to be meaningful and rewarding.

I surfed the internet looking for travel ideas, cost-effective options and different ways that volunteering would be mutually beneficial with my interests, skills and passions. My good friend bought me a book on volunteer travel. In my free time I read, analyzed and sifted through websites and books, and talked with colleagues and friends.

...continue reading "Volunteer Vacations Offer Fulfillment, Service to Others, and Inexpensive Travel"

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Staying in shape will enable you to travel and enjoy spectacular sights.

We all know that we should exercise regularly and eat responsibly in order to stay healthy. The benefits are clear: you will live longer, you will have fewer doctor visits and lower medical bills, and you will be better able to travel and go about your daily routine.

But sadly, according to the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports and Nutrition, only about 30% of adults 65-74 are active.

The problem is that most of us aren’t very good at sticking to things we should do. We are more likely to stay committed to things we want to do. The key to establishing and maintaining a successful exercise regimen is to find the right combination of activities you will enjoy and a reason that is compelling enough to motivate you to stick with it.

You’ve worked hard for your retirement – make sure you are healthy enough to enjoy it. Here are 12 steps to help you succeed at becoming healthier in 2017.
...continue reading "12 Steps to a Longer, Healthier Retirement"

The internet is awash with advice from retirement planning experts. Interestingly, many people who write retirement advice haven’t retired yet or are relatively recent retirees (like me). Plus, much of the advice you read comes from financial planners. That’s important, of course, but as you know, there’s more to a happy retirement than simply saving enough money.

Wouldn’t it be great to receive advice from some older, more experienced retirees who have spent many years living through the experience?

Recently, I had the opportunity to query some residents of Wake Robin, a life plan community in Shelburne, VT, through Wake Robin’s publicist, Charlotte Longley Lyman. I asked the residents questions such as “What advice would you offer to someone who is preparing to retire now?” and “What was the number one thing you wish you had done when starting the retirement process?”

Here are eight bits of sage advice compiled from their answers. Most of this advice is not ground-breaking or new – you’ve probably heard most of it before. But it’s good to have this advice validated by people who have been there and done that.

...continue reading "Experienced Retirees Share Valuable Advice for a Better Retirement"

After you retire, your daily life will change in more ways that you probably imagine. There are many changes you won’t realize until you experience them, but forming a clearer picture of your values and how you want to live your life after you retire will help you make better plans and adapt more easily to the changes retirement brings.  It will also give you a clearer picture of what you can look forward to.

The questions that follow will help you sort these things out. If you’re married or partnered, these are good conversations to have together.  You shouldn’t assume that your spouse wants the same things you do.

...continue reading "18 Questions to Ask Yourself and Your Spouse Before You Retire"

Guest post by Riya Sander

One of the best things about retirement is that you finally have all the time you need to vacation. You have no job that makes you cut your vacation short. After you are retired, you can take all the time you want to see the world. You can cross destinations off your bucket list as you see all the wonderful vacation spots the world has to offer. If you are looking for some amazing vacation destinations, here are ten remarkable places to travel during your retirement.

...continue reading "10 Amazing Vacation Spots for Retired People"

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During your working years, you may have rarely thought about your retirement. When you did, you probably had only a vague, general notion of what your retirement would be like. For many years your retirement probably seemed so far off that you could easily postpone learning, planning and saving for it. As a result, you may have some misconceptions about what retirement is really like, both financially and in terms of your post-career lifestyle.

Here are eight common retirement myths, followed by the reality that belies each of them.

...continue reading "8 Retirement Myths Debunked"

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Don’t just fill your day with activity, fill it with satisfaction.

If you ask many retirees what their life is like, they will probably tell you that they are as busy as ever. Every day is full of errands, shopping, household chores, yard work, TV and movies, club meetings, and all sorts of other things. Their calendars are filled with events, appointments, and get-togethers.

After you retire and you no longer have to go into work every day, it seems like everything else expands, multiplies, and rushes in to consume the time you used to work. You may wonder how you ever had time to work and still get everything else done.

Of course, staying busy certainly beats being bored and having nothing to do.

But after a year or two has passed and you settle into your new normal routine, a sense of discontentment may emerge. It’s subtle at first, lurking just beneath the surface. You will begin to wonder if this is all there is, and if this is what you spent decades of your life working for. You’re busy, and most of it is fun or at least pleasant, but something seems to be missing.

...continue reading "Is Your Retirement Fulfilling – or Just Busy?"